Sunday, July 5, 2015

A Little Inspiration Can Do Wonders


Sometimes, keeping track of research progress can be enough of a drudgery to dull the mind. At other times, a solitary serendipity can do wonders to boost efforts. With the recent twin felicities of at least a hint to connect the migratory dots on my maternal side and the appearance of a possible closer cousin than the DNA testing norm on my husband's maternal line, I've thankfully received enough of a spark to get back on track, working on my goals.

Thus, it was no surprise to see a lift in the numbers, when I returned to tally up my bi-monthly count on the maternal and paternal lines for both myself and my husband. Not only was the initiating news encouraging, but the resultant count sure perked me up, as well.

Granted, both mine and my husband's paternal lines were left nearly flatlined—with only a slight uptick in autosomal DNA matches on my husband's lines to change the count—but each of our maternal lines held the proof of our progress.

Perhaps it was sheer determination that drove me to up the numbers in my maternal family tree by 370 entries, to a total number of people in that tree of 4,336. Now that I see my way clear to believe that my Georgia ancestors could have had a line migrating through Kentucky to Missouri, it's definitely applied some energy to that research effort. I'll be writing more about my conjectures on that possibility in the coming week. While I don't yet have proof of a nexus, at least historically, the move makes more sense.

Likewise, the joy of receiving a close autosomal DNA match for my husband's maternal line certainly provided some research inspiration. I've been back to that Perry County, Ohio, line to clean up details, add documents from viable Ancestry.com "hints" and see if I can push each line forward in time by adding each generation's siblings' descendants as well. The goal is to provide a hook for those people with DNA matches to find a way to connect their tree with ours. If it means I have to reach out more by extending my research, that's fine: the main goal is to connect with these DNA matches, if possible, to align DNA results with our paper trails.

With so many housekeeping tasks to attend to in the Perry County line, it meant slow going. Even so, I managed to add 115 names to that tree, upping the total in my husband's maternal line to 1106. Likewise, though there was only a modest eight additions to his DNA results, at least the most recent one was logged in on July 2. I believe this might be the leading edge of a new batch of tests generated from June genealogical conferences like the Southern California Jamboree I attended, plus the extravaganza back in New York, the Global Family Reunion event. Hopefully, there will be many more DNA results to come from these June efforts.

At this point, we are strategizing to see who else in our families might be willing to participate in DNA testing. While "the more, the merrier" might be an appropriate stance, it's helpful to have specific parts of the family represented. For instance, in order to "triangulate" on test results, it would be helpful to have one cousin from each side of the family participate—in other words, one from the paternal side, one from the maternal side. That way, in evaluating who matches whom among all these other results, the "in common with" device can aid in the analysis. Until we get known cousins like that in the mix, the whole count—and we're talking of upwards of eight hundred in my case—is all in one big, messy pile. Kind of makes it hard to make any progress when everything has to be sorted out from one big jumble.

Another bit of potential inspiration I'm awaiting is the autosomal DNA test result from a new "exact match" I've received on my matrilineal line—my mtDNA test. Just like the other such result I've already received—that of the man I call my mystery cousin—this one belongs to another adoptee. The challenge is amazing, but as I've learned from my first mystery cousin, despite daunting odds, answers can still be found. The question on our minds right now is, how closely are we related? With my first such matrilineal line match, our relationship stretched beyond that of sixth cousin—thus leaving me struggling with a near-impossible quest to find our nexus. Hopefully, the autosomal DNA test will reveal a much closer range of relationship for this second exact match, and we will be able to rely on an already-drawn-up family tree to guide us in determining the point of relationship.

All told, it's these encouraging break-throughs that help get the work back on track. Everybody needs an enegizer like that, from time to time.

Saturday, July 4, 2015

Celebrating Liberty


If you are like the millions of Americans with plans for this holiday weekend, you likely won't be reading this until Monday. Today is a day to be anywhere but sitting in front of a computer screen. There are hot dogs to roast and hamburgers to stack so high with lettuce and tomatoes and pickles and maybe even bacon that you can't even get one into your gaping-wide-open-and-watering mouth. Whether it's iced tea and lemonade calling you to relax on the patio, or wild water sports beckoning you to the lake or river, you have so much more to do than catch up on your genealogy reading.

Right?

Hello?

Uh oh...

At least, I hope you are taking a pleasant break to enjoy your family's style of remembrance of a key historical turning point in our nation's history—if you are one of this blog's American readers. If you are one of our friends from across the way in the United Kingdom, well, I hope you aren't taking all this too badly. All told, after all these years, the Kingdom has fared quite well without us. And for our friends to the north, you've likely also enjoyed your day of similar celebration on the first of the month, with the best of hearty well-wishes, eh?

I've decided to take a break, myself, to celebrate American Independence Day by finally getting the last of gathered documents scanned and dispatched to the registrar of my local D.A.R. chapter. I know that will please at least one dedicated D.A.R. board member (who has been patiently shepherding me through this process). Though through the process, I've discovered more than one patriot who can qualify me for membership—as well as another one to qualify my daughter and my sisters-in-law, as well—it's best to remember to focus on one goal and get something done.

All this "Bright Shiny" of historical and genealogical research can sometimes be too inspiring. As I work my way through researching the lines of my various ancestors, I get caught up in the human drama that was part of their lives, and forget the research task immediately at hand.

But though that may not be my specific research purpose at the moment, that detour into other branches of the micro-history of personal heritage is an important journey, as well. The unfolding of these personal dramas—especially those during key times during the 1770s and 1780s—make me realize the crux of the struggle we now so blithely celebrate. It's those individual stories of sacrifice, pain, and even loss that awaken me to get in touch with the reality of the immense cost borne by these brave people—the impact that reverberated from the point of each affected patriot through to parents, spouses, and children back home, awaiting word of loved ones in the midst of battle.

And we are their descendants. This is our heritage. That awaited word has made a difference for us, too.

As long as we keep remembering.



Above: "A Ride for Liberty: The Fugitive Slaves," 1862 oil on paper board by American artist Eastman Johnson; courtesy Wikipedia; in the public domain.

Friday, July 3, 2015

Getting From Hither to Yon


It's one big problem in genealogical research: an ancestor you've been studiously following, tracking backwards in time over years of life's twists and turns, suddenly disappears. The paper trail goes cold.

Sometimes, that big change comes at you with clues: census records warn you that the man who settled in Missouri was, many years before, born in Kentucky. Sometimes, the disappearance comes with no trace: a married woman for whom no maiden name has been supplied leaves no confirming documents.

It's helpful to understand general migratory patterns when desperate for direction on those missing-in-action ancestors.

Of course, some patterns are more obvious than others—witness the immense draw of the beautiful woman standing in New York harbor whom we've dubbed the Statue of Liberty; legions of immigrants have followed the siren call, forsaking destitute situations across the Atlantic Ocean in war-torn countries of Europe for her welcoming greeting in a New World.

Other patterns only become obvious to the genealogical researcher after laying aside the ancestor treasure hunt for a refresher course in local history. In seeking answers about the family of my mystery cousin—the one tracing the matrilineal line stalled at the 1860s point of Sarah Kinslow Stinebaugh in Dallas County, Missouri—it was indeed confirming to find neighboring immigrant settlers following the very pattern I was seeking.

I needed to find a company of immigrants who started in Georgia, moved through Kentucky, and ultimately settled in the region near Dallas County, Missouri. I found a possibility—and one conveniently also related to my own maternal lines—in the family of one Frederick George Gilmer.

Gilmer is one of those early American colonial names that comes in handy in genealogical research. If you have the good fortune of uncovering that surname in your family's history, you can tap into a wealth of other people's research and documentation via an assortment of published material of the late nineteenth century and the early years of the twentieth century.

Not only that, but like many of those early colonial families, in the case of the Gilmers, there was much intermarriage between surnames. The Gilmer line includes a number of related names also in my family tree, such as Taliaferro, Harvie and Meriwether. Likewise, each of those other families have a number of genealogies published regarding their heritage—offering possibilities to cross-check one author's research against the other manuscripts.

The target person I had stumbled upon, late last Sunday evening when I should have been putting my research to bed for the night, was a woman by the name of Sarah Harvie Gilmer. Don't let that name fool you into thinking she was married with children; according to her Find A Grave memorial, she died childless. Hers was not a misapplied (and misspelled) masculine middle name. Nor a kept maiden name. The surname-as-middle-name device, customary among some of my Southern ancestors, provided the hint that this Gilmer descendant was related to the Harvie family—a good sign, indeed, for me.

Sarah's entry first caught my eye because, well, she was named Sarah. Also, conveniently, she was born in Kentucky but had migrated to Lincoln County, Missouri. I had, out of desperation in grappling with my mystery cousin's Sarah Kinslow Stinebaugh, tried an experiment on Find A Grave: search for all Sarahs within a birth time frame who were mentioned as living in Missouri. (I still am not satisfied that our mystery Sarah was indeed a Kinslow.) That's how I had spotted this Sarah.

Sarah Harvie Gilmer turned out to be a daughter of Frederick George Gilmer, who in turn was a son of John Thornton Gilmer and Martha Gaines Harvie.

That, as you now see, is where Sarah's middle name Harvie came in: from her paternal grandmother. And that Harvie and Gilmer family had come from Wilkes County, Georgia, that huge post-colonial county from which was later carved, among others, Oglethorpe County where some of my Taliaferro kin once lived.

Though there is not even any glimmer of a connection between the one Sarah (Kinslow) and the other (Gilmer), the existence of that family—who, conveniently, along the way, stopped long enough in Kentucky to birth some of their children—gives me not only the idea but the hope that this was a potential line of travel not only for this Gilmer line, but for the family from which this other Sarah originated. And, given the proclivity for intermarriage among my family lines, perhaps a chance for this Kinslow daughter to have somehow been intertwined with that Gilmer and Harvie line as well.

After all, something had to move our mystery Sarah from her birthplace in Kentucky to her married home in Missouri. Not only that, but there had to be a nexus, somewhere in the mystery Sarah's ancestry, connecting her matrilineal line with that of mine.

Before I could uncover that link, though, I needed to discover just how these families left Georgia for Kentucky—and ended up in Missouri.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

For Every Action...


...there is an equal and opposite reaction...

Well, that's not entirely true. But perhaps what I was uncovering in my race to find the nexus between my mystery cousin and myself in this post-mtDNA revelation that we are "exact matches" was proving a more exacting force upon me than I counted on.

So I stumbled upon a record indicating that yes, there were members of my matrilineal line migrating westwardnot in the typical path southward and then across the Gulf states, eventually to Texas, but headed roughly due west from Virginia through Kentucky and ultimately to Missouri. It was a shiver-inducing discovery (even in this heat wave!) whose promise left me awestruck.

Representing such a slim chance of a genealogical match, why would I get excited, as if this were the key to connecting my mystery cousin's ancestor Sarah Kinslow Stinebaugh with my Gilmer relations? After all, that would make for some procedurally sloppy research to jump to such conclusions.

Admittedly, all that discovery served to do was confirm to me that, yes, it was possible for people to migrate in that pattern, even though the rest of the family headed elsewhere. But it was handy for another reason: people heading out into the wild open spaces westward—and away from all the supports of civilization—needed as much help as they could get. That's why they often traveled in companies.

And the path that Dr. Frederick George Gilmer took, from his 1806 birthplace in Wilkes County, Georgia, through Christian County, Kentucky, and ultimately to Lincoln County, Missouri, might just have been the same path followed by my mystery cousin's kin.

Sensing the possibility of being on to something might have played havoc with me, somewhere deep within. Who knows? Or maybe it was the concurrent, incessant banging on my roof, courtesy of the diligent construction crew performing a pricy make-over on the top half exterior of our humble abode for most of the past month. Or blame it on the heat.

All it took was one early morning moment to stoop down and greet the cat—my favorite cat, I might add—and out went my back. I don't know if it was an equal and opposite reaction to all the stress piling up over the last few days—both the bad and the good—but that momentary "reaction" landed me flat on my back and too dazed to think clearly through any further research.

Oh, I've poked around and found some interesting links on that Gilmer family, all right. They are amply documented, with records flung even to the far reaches of the Internet. As for putting the narrative together in a cohesive manner though, well, let's just say I'll need some R&R equal to that opposite reaction before I can again think straight—or even stand straight.

Let's just call this Newton's posture prompter.

Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Sometimes, You Just Know



Why is it that, in the midst of the most frustrating defeats, something seems to work itself loose and open up a possibility that—though it hasn't yet been fully proven—you just know will lead to the right answer?

I cannot begin to tell the countless hours I've spent, sifting through data, trying to unearth patterns that will lead me backwards on my path through time to the woman who correspondingly, taken forward in time again, would yield a female descendant who would become the mother of the adoptee whose DNA test tells him he and I are exactly linked.

Sensing my lack of progress, I've redoubled my effort this summer. But the more I add to my database of ancestors and their related lines, the less I feel I am succeeding.

I had hoped that switching tracks would jump start a stalled project: rather than pursue my line back in time, look for the nexus in my mystery cousin's line. But as you have probably already noticed, I am mired in the disappointing research snares of burned courthouses and missing records on that account, as well.

Last weekend, I told myself I needed to strategize this search better. In fleshing out my skeletal family tree—typically, in genealogical research, we seek out the direct line, not the collateral lines as much—I had now been adding siblings in each line, then bringing those lines forward to the present generation. That would work well in finding ways to match with those other eight-hundred-plus matches on my autosomal DNA test, but it wasn't doing much for this matrilineal pursuit. I needed to focus on one goal at a time, and if I wanted to find the answer to how I was related to this mystery cousin, that meant looking solely at the women's lines descending from my direct matrilineal line.

In other words, keep the route straight on the narrow path of mother's-mother's-mother. And then, only the women born to those mothers—and, in turn, their daughters—until I reach the terminal descendant, in my mystery cousin's case, a son.

So those were my marching orders: evaluate every female descendant descending from that specific matrilineal line.

I don't do well with taking orders.

Well, when I started out, I meant well. I looked at my maternal grandmother—she being the mother of only one daughter who had children of her own. That wouldn't work. I took one baby step backward through the generations to her mother, Sarah Broyles McClellan, who again had only one daughter who bore children.

Repeat one more generation: the next contestant was her mother, Mary Rainey, the woman who reportedly was adopted—in my opinion, taken in by family as an orphan—and then, on the other end of her life, had died young, before the age of customary documentation for deaths. Though I know little about her before her marriage to Thomas Taliaferro Broyles, I do know she had not one, but two daughters who then had children of their own.

However—and you know there would be a caveat, even here—Mary's other daughter was the proud mother of sons. End of that matrilineal line.

Moving up yet another generation proved to be a problem. How was I to know for certain who Mary's mother was? I did find someone whom I believe is my Mary in the household of her relatives in Georgia, just before her marriage to Thomas Broyles, pointing to the possibility of extended family relationships. And I did locate a possible Mary in a Rainey household in Georgia—though after the death of the father, leaving me with a mother also named Mary, an unfortunately too-common name on which to hang one's confidence.

Let's just say that the elder Mary Rainey was the right mother. She certainly had many daughters from which to choose possible routes for another iteration of her matrilineal line.

But that was the 1860s, and not only was war the mode of the tension-filled decade, but the invisibility of daughters given in marriage, duly noted in records filed at soon-to-be-burned courthouses, made the search wearying.

That's where I got bogged down. And that's where, last weekend on a lark, I decided to swim upstream and try my hand at another generation. Not only was my plan stalled at Mary Taliaferro Rainey's generation, but I needed a branch of the extended family with a migratory pattern much different than the one typical for this part of the family—instead of heading from Virginia to Georgia to the deep South, a trail that went westerly, from Virginia to Kentucky and then onward to Missouri.

No one was showing me the way to the Show Me State. But that's where I needed to go.

The next stop, in my tour of generations, was also puzzling me. I really had no indication of Mary Taliaferro Rainey's parents. I had a good guess, based on who took in her orphaned children after her passing. So making that assumption would mean also hoping the mtDNA test would bear out the hypothesis—yet maybe lead me farther away from my original goal of locating the nexus with my mystery cousin.

You can see how mired in the details I became, pondering these women and their changeable names and identities. Coupled with that was one unfortunate anomaly: a family of intermarriages. Moving backward into those decades before the Civil War, I entered the arena of old colonial families for whom arranged marriages among families familiar with each other seemed customary. Thus, I saw surnames echoed through the generations, when taking the sweeping view forward in time from their colonial Virginian origin. I saw Taliaferros intertwined with Gilmers and Meriwethers, Harvies and Lewises, their names waltzing in and out of the generations in grand procession.

I became quite at home with seeing these repeating surnames. Perhaps that was what caught my eye while stymied with considerations about just what to do with this "adopted" Mary Rainey Broyles and her maybe-mother, Mary Taliaferro Rainey. If I followed my best hunch about her mother—incidentally, in direct opposition to respected genealogies of bygone centuries—I would then be looking at the daughters and sisters of one Mary Meriwether Gilmer, wife of Warren Taliaferro. Her mother, in turn, would be Elizabeth Lewis, wife of Thomas Meriwether Gilmer.

You see how those surnames echo through the generations.

Though I'm not sure how this next step happened, it was in that late Sunday night ennui when sleep might have been a better choice. I was still poking through records, trying to find marriage connections and female descendants for these women. I ran across one name, recognized that redundant surname echo, and wondered what else could be found on that person. I jumped from Ancestry.com to FamilySearch.org to Find A Grave, looking.

Perhaps it was from sheer exhaustion with the whole process that I forgot to note my path as I wandered online. Somehow I came to my senses while looking up a Sarah on Find A Grave. Among the possibilities offered for my search was someone named Sarah Harvie Gilmer, daughter of Frederick George Gilmer. Though the Find A Grave memorial stated she had no children of her own, I couldn't help but be arrested by her entry.

I took a look at the list of parents and siblings linked to her name. Not only were those same old surnames creating a siren call in my head, but here was a man (Sarah's father) who was born in Georgia, stopped long enough in Kentucky to have children there, and then moved on to Lincoln County, Missouri.

Now, Lincoln County may not be a locale that rings a bell for you—even if you've been here over the long haul to put up with my internal agony over lack of research progress—but it was one of those along-the-way details that I spared in the narrative. However, before our Sarah Kinslow and her husband, William Stinebaugh, settled in Dallas County, Missouri, William had evidently grown up in none other than Lincoln County.

Of course, it is a long way from the Stinebaugh and Kinslow genealogy to any connection with the Gilmer and Harvie clans—with, incidentally, some Taliaferros thrown in for good measure—but somehow, it was enough to elicit that awestruck gut response in me.

You know this is one lead I'll need to follow.



Above: "The Cottage in the Lane," 1827 drawing in pen and ink with gray wash by English artist, John Constable; courtesy Wikipedia; in the public domain.


Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Crowdsourcing the Kinslows
...And the Huckabys


Still stymied by lack of documentation after the revelation that William Stinebaugh's Kentucky-born wife was once a Kinslow, I've been guessing my way along the path of census records, marriage records, and now burial records. All this, of course, is an exercise based on conjecture: that the only other Kinslow for miles around the Stinebaugh home in Dallas County, Missouri, would actually be a relation of Sarah Kinslow Stinebaugh.

That man in question was named Page Kinslow. He was the right age to be a brother of Sarah. And he just happened to be from Kentucky. Barren County, Kentucky, to be precise.

We've already rejoiced over the fact that Barren County did not happen to be a "burned" county, and that transcriptions of marriage records posted online helped us follow the trail of Agnes Payne, through her first marriage to Page's father, Joseph Kinslow, and then, as a widowed mother of two young children, to her second husband, Joseph Huckaby.

Setting aside the possibility that this might all be a false lead, I thought I'd see what could be found about the family of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Huckaby, once they all moved to Missouri. I have to keep reminding myself that I might be barking up the wrong family tree—but at the same time, I'm very aware that researching this new discovery might lead me to the very resources that can answer my question.

What could possibly go wrong? At the very least, I'd confidently be able to negate my hypothesis. Even that is progress.

So I clicked over to Find A Grave to see if there were any entries for Joseph Huckaby, Page's step-dad.

There was.

Even though there wasn't any cross-reference hyperlinked to Page Kinslow's own memorial on Find A Grave, it was easy enough to find Joseph Huckaby's memorial. As it turns out, Joseph was indeed married more than once, as the 1850 census, back in Kentucky, had suggested. Born in Virginia in 1789, Joseph had served in the War of 1812. This could be a research situation ripe with helpful material.

Better than that—and more pertinent to my own research goal—Joseph's wife Aggy had a Find A Grave memorial of her own, complete with a photograph.

The memorial indicated Aggy was actually born in Barren County, Kentucky. She was buried, predictably, in Polk County, Missouri, where the entire Huckaby family had settled after removing from Kentucky. Some kind soul had, thankfully, hyperlinked her memorial with that of several of her children—as well as with her parents. The memorial was turning out to be quite a treasure trove.

The best part, for me, was the discovery of two newspaper clippings which had been added as photographs to the memorial. The only drawback: each of those newspaper reports was clipped, all right: right inside the column marker, cutting off the first few words at the beginning of each line for one of the articles, and the end of each line for the other article.

All told, wonder woman Agnes Payne Kinslow Huckaby was mother to at least fifteen children—plus step-mother to the several that Joseph had already fathered by his previous wife. Still, I wanted to read the whole of the obituaries that were posted at Find A Grave, not just guess what the missing words might have been.

Fortunately, search engine power was in my favor. Google turned up another resource containing transcriptions of those very same articles: a Rootsweb file which included a huge page of entries for Agnes. Among the details I found interesting was that, having lived to the age of ninety one—coupled with the fact that, being so much younger than her husband, she lived until 1911—Aggy was "one of the three last pensioners" of the War of 1812.

Still, the best I could find out about that question that bugged me—the name of that second Kinslow child—was a dismissive mention that Agnes had had two children by her previous marriage.

Is that all they could say?!

Of course, the possibility—though slim—that Joseph Huckaby's wife's pension application would include any mention of her two Kinslow children drew me beyond the transcribed notes on this Rootsweb file to the actual digitized images of those pension papers at Fold3.com. Though I managed to obtain the dates I was missing—Joseph Kinslow's death in "July 1840" and that of Joseph Huckaby's first wife Mary in August of 1836—any mention of Agnes' first two children eluded me.

Even so, if I supposed that the mysterious "Joseh Ann" entry from the 1850 census was indeed my Sarah A. Stinebaugh of much later years, tracing back her matrilineal line through the details given on the Find A Grave memorial—and then, piggy-backing those names onto other family trees posted at Ancestry and Rootsweb—I couldn't see any familiar surnames to claim as that nexus I was seeking with my mystery cousin, the adoptee with whom I had an exact match resultant from our mitochondrial DNA test.

Mired in so much data—much of it taking on the cast of a genealogical wild goose chase—I was beginning to lose steam. Maybe this quest wasn't such a good idea, after all. Maybe trying to match the genealogical paper trail with the tale told by DNA testing wasn't going to work, after all. That ingenious creation of scientific pursuit—the mtDNA test—was turning out to be too powerful an opponent to take on. I already knew, from autosomal testing, that my mystery cousin and I did not connect within the range of sixth cousin. Who knows how much farther back the nexus might be.

Frankly, sifting through all the possibilities was just wearing me out.

Monday, June 29, 2015

A Second Start


Finding Page Kinslow—whom I hoped would turn out to be brother of my targeted Sarah Kinslow Stinebaugh—in Barren County, Kentucky, was a start. This helped me trace back from Missouri to a likely birthplace for Sarah. If, that is, she was sister of Page Kinslow.

Though some thoughtful volunteers had posted Barren County marriage records online—henceforth saving them from at least the fate of a burned courthouse—I still had some tap dancing to do, once I landed on that helpful page of transcriptions. Why? Because the record I found on the 1850 census for that county showed Page and his sister—whatever her name was—in the household of a man named Joseph Huckaby.

I thought it might be a good idea to waltz on over to the transcribed marriage entries underneath the heading "H" to take a look.

Sure enough, there was a Joseph Huckaby entered on the list of grooms in Barren County. On June 23, 1841, he apparently was wed to a woman named Agnes Kinslow. Since the 1850 census showed the Joseph Huckaby household including a thirty year old female named "Agness" combined with a twenty three year old William Huckaby on the next line, this could either be an older daughter of Joseph, or possibly a second wife, since there were others listed in the household under the age of ten, including the two Kinslow children.

If this Agnes were Joseph's wife, by 1850 they would have been married for nine years. Joseph Huckaby, by this time aged fifty eight, likely had been married before, though no entry on the Barren County marriage transcriptions fit that scenario. Correspondingly, the groom's list for the "K" entries had shown a marriage between a Joseph Kinslow and an "Aggy" Payne on August 3, 1837—leaving just enough time for Aggy to bear Joseph one or possibly two children before his untimely death and Aggy's subsequent marriage.

At least, that sounded like a reasonable scenario. After all, even in a county with the twenty thousand people Barren County contained at that point, what were the chances that there would be two Agnes Kinslows there?

I don't like chances much, though, so I thought I'd take another look.

As it turned out, Page Kinslow had a memorial on Find A Grave. Some helpful volunteer had noted on that entry that Page was son of Joseph Kinslow and Agnes Payne.

Well, at least someone agrees with me.

Come to find out, there were others who thought so, too. Though I couldn't find any memorials on Find A Grave for the unfortunate man who left Agnes a widow so soon, there was an entry for her second husband—and one for Agnes, herself. And they weren't sparse entries, either. Someone—or two, or three—was being a wonderful Find A Grave volunteer, indeed.
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