Thursday, May 30, 2013

Still Same as Sam


While Earle Raymond Bean trailed his older brother, Samuel William, by nearly five years, the two shared so many similarities. Their appearance, for one: tall, lanky, big-footed, narrow-faced, and topped with dark, curly hair.

And oh, there was one other similarity: they both had Marfan syndrome.

Perhaps it was owing to that last irregularity that, only nine days after bidding Sam Bean goodbye, the family was gathered around his younger brother, repeating the same unbearable process.
            Funeral services will be held tomorrow for Earl R. Bean, 29, of 48 Via El Monte, San Lorenzo, who died Sunday in an Oakland hospital.
            Mr. Bean's death followed by 11 days the death of his brother, Samuel W. Bean Jr., 34, former associate of the Ice Follies.
            A native Californian, Earl Bean formerly lived in Alameda. A Marine Corps veteran of World War II, he was a member of Oakland Lodge No. 324, Loyal Order of Moose.
            He is survived by his wife, Marilyn.
            The funeral will be held at 11:30 a.m. tomorrow at the Fowler-Anderson Mortuary, 2244 Santa Clara Ave., Alameda. Interment will be Golden Gate National Cemetery, San Bruno.

8 comments:

  1. 29 even younger than his brother:(

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    1. It was really young. Just a life getting started...

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  2. The "bad genes" really killed off this branch of the family tree in a hurry. Life simply wasn't fair to them --

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    1. And those "bad genes" seemed to get even weaker with each passing generation.

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  3. At this point, did the family know the term Marfan Syndrome? Did they know/suspect that Earl would be dying shortly too? This story sounds much like the cases in my family where several children died within weeks of each other, but it was in times of an epidemic.

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    1. Wendy, I'm not really sure when the family actually became aware of the term, Marfan syndrome, but I know it was at least some time either around the point of Earle's death or within the next ten years.

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  4. That's so sad! In my husbands tree his family was dying of Huntington's Disease. I even wrote about it once on my genealogy blog. Back then , I guess doctors were in the dark when it came to most medicine and illness.

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    1. It's sad to see that happen in families. Sometimes, it was before medical advances were able to provide answers. In some cases, though, even now there are no suitable answers to some syndromes and conditions.

      That must have been difficult for those in your husband's family who were dealing with Huntington's disease, Betty. Though what Wendy mentioned had to do with contagious diseases, even that is difficult. No matter what the cause, it is always hard to lose someone you love.

      Regardless, I'm still thankful for medical advances, and despite health limitations, I know people with such conditions who are nevertheless grateful for the opportunity for life, even if it is limited.

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